Page 1 of 1

Luke 4 confusion

PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:22 am
by little_tigress
22 All spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his lips. “Isn’t this Joseph’s son?” they asked.

23 Jesus said to them, “Surely you will quote this proverb to me: ‘Physician, heal yourself!’ And you will tell me, ‘Do here in your hometown what we have heard that you did in Capernaum.’”

24 “Truly I tell you,” he continued, “no prophet is accepted in his hometown. 25 I assure you that there were many widows in Israel in Elijah’s time, when the sky was shut for three and a half years and there was a severe famine throughout the land. 26 Yet Elijah was not sent to any of them, but to a widow in Zarephath in the region of Sidon. 27 And there were many in Israel with leprosy[g] in the time of Elisha the prophet, yet not one of them was cleansed—only Naaman the Syrian.”

28 All the people in the synagogue were furious when they heard this. 29 They got up, drove him out of the town, and took him to the brow of the hill on which the town was built, in order to throw him off the cliff. 30 But he walked right through the crowd and went on his way.



I find it amazing how quickly the views and attitudes of the crowd changed here. They went from being amazed by Christ and speaking well of him to homicidal rage.

But I'm not sure I understand why. Clearly he's telling them that he knows he'll be rejected by them, but how do Elijah and Elisha fit into this? And why do those examples draw such an extreme response from the crowd?

Any guesses? :)

Re: Luke 4 confusion

PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:47 am
by sketcher
http://www.biblestudytools.com/commenta ... -4-26.html
Not worthy of the miracles they wanted to see? Ouch.
http://www.biblestudytools.com/commenta ... -4-28.html
Comparing them to Israel in Ahab's and Jezebel's day? Double ouch. Gentiles are preferable to them? Triple ouch.

Overall, this revealed their character and true motives. It's one thing to be upset after a rebuke or insult. It's another to take a public speaker in a holy place to a cliff and attempt to push him over. Contrast this with the Syro-Phonecian woman whose daughter had a demon. Her faith and decency was revealed, and she got her request after all.